WHAT IS CARDIOMYOPATHY?

CARDIOMYOPATHY IS A CONDITION WHICH EFFECTS HUNDREDS OF THOUSANDS OF PEOPLE, SOME OF WHICH DON'T EVEN KNOW THEY HAVE IT YET. KNOWING CAN BE THE MOST IMPORTANT STEP.

Cardiomyopathy (KAR-de-o-mi-OP-ah-thee) refers to diseases of the heart muscle. These diseases have many causes, signs and symptoms, and treatments.

 

In cardiomyopathy, the heart muscle becomes enlarged, thick, or rigid. In rare cases, the muscle tissue in the heart is replaced with scar tissue.

 

As cardiomyopathy worsens, the heart becomes weaker. It's less able to pump blood through the body and maintain a normal electrical rhythm. This can lead to heart failure or irregular heartbeats called arrhythmias (ah-RITH-me-ahs). In turn, heart failure can cause fluid to build up in the lungs, ankles, feet, legs, or abdomen.

 

The weakening of the heart also can cause other complications, such as heart valve problems.

 

Overview

The main types of cardiomyopathy are:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dilated cardiomyopathy

Hypertrophic (hi-per-TROF-ik) cardiomyopathy

Restrictive cardiomyopathy

Arrhythmogenic (ah-rith-mo-JEN-ik) right ventricular dysplasia

(dis-PLA-ze-ah)

Other types of cardiomyopathy sometimes are referred to as "unclassified cardiomyopathy."

 

Cardiomyopathy can be acquired or inherited. "Acquired" means you aren't born with the disease, but you develop it due to another disease, condition, or factor. "Inherited" means your parents passed the gene for the disease on to you. Many times, the cause of cardiomyopathy isn't known.

 

Cardiomyopathy can affect people of all ages. However, people in certain age groups are more likely to have certain types of cardiomyopathy.